Planning A Meal? Try these:
Appetizer: Herbed Mushrooms
Ave. Rating is


More Like This:
Mint Tea Ave. Rating is 5

More Recipes from eliec :
Beef Stew with Chickpeas Ave. Rating is 5
Fried Eggplant Ave. Rating is 5
Lentil Soup Ave. Rating is 5
Lahma (Beef) Sofrito Ave. Rating is 5
Burekas Ave. Rating is 5

 

See all of eliec 's recipes

 

 

Search Jewish Web




 

Turkish Coffee
Ave. Rating is 4.5 (2 ratings) Add Your Comments and Ratings

Posted by:  

Turkish coffee is traditionally prepared in a feenjan, which can be purchased in Middle Eastern markets or specialty shops. The pot is wide at the bottom, narrow toward the top, and has a long handle. Turkish coffee should be served in small cylindrical cups; espresso cups are suitable. My father taught me how to make Turkish coffee and gave me my first feenjan.

Serves: 1

Prep Time:
Cook Time:
Total Time:

Sephardic Parve Beverage

Recipe Tools
Share Recipe
Email to a friend
Print Recipe
Print this recipe
Add to My Cookbook
Rate this recipe



Ingredients

1 tbs. finely ground Turkish coffee (available at stores specializing in Middle Eastern foods)
1 tsp. sugar (more or less depending on taste)
cardamom pods to taste

Directions

  1. Thoroughly mix coffee and sugar in a feenjan or a saucepan.
  2. Add water (the measure of a serving cup plus a little more), stir well.
  3. Add cardamom pods (experiment to achieve desired taste) and bring coffee to a boil. When the foam on top begins to rise, remove coffee from heat until it settles and repeat process. My father repeats this process twice, though once should be enough.
  4. Pour into a coffee cup. The coffee grounds will sink to the bottom of the cup; do not stir them up and don’t drink them.
  5. Serve immediately.

Reader Comments


Vic Gabay says...
Rating is

I agree with eliec's dad, repeat the process TWICE. Why? I have absolutely no clue, but that's the way my Sephardic Turk dad taught me, so that's the way I still do it!! :-)
Nov 24, 2008 (report abuse)


Vic Gabay says...
Rating is 5

Have you ever used the grounds to tell fortunes? Turn the empty cup upsidedown, the grounds will drip down the inside of the cup to form various patterns. Someone who claims to know how will look at the pattern to "tell your fortune". My mom used to do it.
Nov 24, 2008 (report abuse)


David Angel says...
Rating is 4

Repeating the boiling twice (total: 3) is traditional.
Apr 6, 2012 (report abuse)


 

 

Add A Comment:
Character count (1000 max):   256 1000 characters max.

Name:

Rate this Recipe:


security code
Enter security code exactly as it appears

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© 2008-10 Recipe Trader